Why Is Marketing So Hard?

Transcript

– Alright, morning, everyone. So, the challenge that we face as business owners, marketing professionals, advertisers, is that, people see thousands of brand messages every day and they don’t care what we do. There’s lots of studies that can find, some will say it’s between 3,000 and 20,000, some say 10,000 but you’ll agree, literally thousands and thousands of messages that they see every day. So why is marketing so hard? So I think, because our brain, everyone’s brain has an attention gatekeeper. You can think of it as a bouncer so it will decide whether your message is accepted or not. And I think we’re talking to the wrong part of the brain because we’re not talking to that attention gatekeeper. Okay, so just a quick overview of our brain. Our reptilian brain, this is the simple part of our brain. It’s designed to help us survive. And that’s connected to all of our senses. So what I’m talking about here, the attention gatekeeper, the bouncer, our reptilian brain sees your message first and it will decide whether it’s thought about emotionally or rationally. What I think one of the problems is, you think about a marketing message using the rational part of our brain, and we expect that it will be received by the rational part of our customer’s brain. But it’s not, it’s gonna go through the reptilian brain first, the most evolved part of our brain, the most simple part of our brain.

Sell the problem first, then the solution

Transcript

So it’s designed to make us survive. in order to speak to the survival instinct, it’s more interested in avoiding pain, than it is in creating joy. I think what a lot of us do, is look at the benefits of what we do, how it’s great for you. But actually, our reptilian brains are more interested in reducing pain. To help think about the reason why you set up your business, or the reason for the benefits. Kind of put it on it’s head, and think about how that benefit would pain. You’re customers are gonna be more interested in that. So effectively, you wanna sell the problem first, and then provide the solution. So if you start here, example of a company that launched a new hoover. They’re going up against Dyson. So you might have thought it was mad to go against this company with a new hoover, and he’s spent a lot of time designing this new hoover that he could just dive straight in to all the benefits. So he will get it. The first 15 seconds, he sells the problem, and then he provides a solution. – Let’s face it, vacuuming can be a pain. Shackled by the weight, and tethered by the cord. The minute you finish, more mess appears. And do we really want to touch the dirt when we empty? I designed the powerful new Gtech AirRam, to help you break free. You get high performance, cordless cleaning. Even on embedded pet hair. It glides from carpet to hard floor, with no settings to change. And it’s new airlock feature picks up big bits from the surface, and fine dust from deep down. The AirRam gives you up to 40 minutes powerful cleaning. Plenty to do your home twice. Oh, good dog. The first is compacted into a bale, and empties with a slide. Order your Gtech AirRam today. For 199 pounds, with free delivery. Find out more, at gtech.co.uk. – Okay. That was a quite successful advert. Now release new products, around electric charging etc So you solve the problem first, then you provide the solution

Contrast Is Really Easy To Understand

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Okay, so, the reptilian brain is really simple. It understands contrast really well. So, good and bad, with our product or service or without it. what it’s like choosing our service or choosing X. And this is a product launch used to contrast really well. – Hi, I’m a Mac. – And I’m a PC. – I’m into doing fun stuff, like movies, music, podcasts. – And I also do fun stuff, like spreadsheets, and time sheets, and pie charts. – Yeah, PC, it’s quite hard to capture a family holiday with say, a pie chart. – Not really. For example, this light gray area could represent shenanigans and tomfoolery, while this dark gray area could represent high jinx. And you see here, we’ve further divided high jinx into capers, monkey business, and just larking about. – Wow, I feel like I was there. – There’s a couple of things going on, but we use contrast to explain that, we also simplify the message, and then if we think again about the new product launch, they didn’t talk about product, they didn’t talk about the size of the screen, or the hard drive, or the memory, or the RAM or anything. They didn’t bog anyone down with details. It simplifies two messages using contrast. So, a Macs probably better for the home, for the family. PC is probably better for the office. You’re probably a bit nerdy if you’ve got a PC, and a bit cooler if you’ve got a Mac. So it’s just two simple messages and they created a raft of these. They all have a simple message in each. That you don’t need to tell everyone everything to bond together.

Demonstrate Tangible Value

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So I said it doesn’t care what you do because it’s, theirs It’s more interested in what it means for them. So how can you appeal to the self centered nature, so once they see tangible value, so what is in it for them, so they do business with you. So to give you a quick example of tangible value. So this is a portable floodlight sport teams. So a lot of amateur sports teams will have one set of permanent floodlights and that will be on their match day pitch, but they’ll have other pitches that their training on. For all the amateur teams, their training is in the evening. So like Tuesday or Thursday night. Majority of the season is like November, December, it’s dark essentially. They’ve got two choices. To either train in the sports hall, pay extra to do that. Or train on their match day pitch and it gets ruined. Talking to them about tangible value, you save money renting indoor space for evening trainings and you won’t destroy your match day pitch. That’s the tangible value of that product. It’s nothing to do with flicker free LED lights that you don’t need planning permission, there’s funding available, unless there’s tangible value. It goes back to selling the problem first, how you gonna solve that problem.

Visual Metaphors Are Really Easy To Understand

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– Okay, so the visual metaphor. So reptilian brain is connected to the senses. It’s easier to process images than text and we remember and think using images which make visual metaphors really easy to understand. So you could say that Coca-Cola is really evil corporation and we art Pepsi are young, cool and funky. You can show that. You can say don’t drink and drive you could cause an accident. We all know that and we say that and we think it’s gonna effect how we drive home today. But, I think this is more powerful. It says “Reserved. Drunk drivers.” At weight watchers we say we help people lose weight. And we know that from the name and we say that, I don’t think people got much impact. But something like this. And you could say having a family could cause you to get wrinkles. Nivea moisturiser could help. Having a two year old myself that can really connect with me. Well. Okay.