Should I Use A Landing Page Or My Website?

– The landing page where someone arrives once they’ve clicked you ad is obviously really important, and sometimes you’ll be better off using your website so they can go and explore and have a look around, and sometimes just a one, single landing page that’s really direct is gonna work. So it really depends on the financial service product that you provide, or advice, whatever it is. So, I mean rules are there to be broken, but I guess the closest thing I can come to a rule is where, if it’s someone needs advice because they don’t know what they want and they don’t really understand your financial service product, then the website’s probably a really great place to send them to, and sending them to some content where they can get to know you, build a bit of trust, and just learn about you and your business. That’s probably one way to use a website, and I’d use a landing page if they know what they want, they understand what it is, and they need to get the best deal, and they wanna speak to someone that can help them quickly. And then a landing page is really super relevant, that still kinda shows you and your people and makes it really easy for them to engage with you. Either they pick up the phone to you, that’s the ideal, of that they ask for you to call them back. Whether using your landing page or whether using your website, the kinda the Golden Rule is to be as relevant as possible. So it will be quite rare that your home page is the most relevant page. I often use our home page because we have niched right down, we work just with financial services businesses, we know they need leads, and my home page is effectively a sales page. But for you, you might have multiple services, multiple products, so it might be quite rare that the home page is the most relevant. So you should know, with your advertising, what that person is after or what they’re researching, and you send them to the most relevant page, whether it be your website or your landing page. All of the advertising platforms, maybe not LinkedIn and Twitter, use like a relevancy score, quality score or guidelines that give you basic cheaper costs if your ad is relevant to the audience and relevant to what they’re looking for. Especially with Facebook, especially with Google Ads, relevancy is key and it’s obviously gonna benefit your customer if they get to the right page, get to the source of the info that they need straightaway. Now one thing to note is if you’re looking at Google Analytics, the bounce rate might be higher because they’re on the page that they need to, they don’t necessarily need to look around, so don’t be worried about high bounce rates from paid advertising if you are sending them to the page that they need. They don’t need to look at other pages, and most of them won’t. So one thing to note and remember is don’t worry if your conversion rate is low to begin with. You do get other opportunities with re-marketing, so that’s when someone hits your site, and then goes back on to like a social media platform or another website, and sees your ad again. You get plenty of opportunities. If they’ve been on your site once, and they’ve spent a bit of time on it, they’re probably interested in what you do, and you do have other opportunities to get in front of them. So, if you don’t get it right first time, learn from that, so don’t continue with a page that doesn’t convert at all, I mean that would be madness obviously. But learn from how people are interacting. I’ll drop link into something called Hotjar. You can watch back how people have interacted with that page or with your website and that whole journey. Learn from that. It’s an ongoing cycle of making either your website or your landing pages better all the time.

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