087 – Advice for Start Ups

087 - Advice for Start Ups
087 - Advice for Start Ups

Alex:
Hello and welcome back to the advisors assembled podcast formerly known as lead generation for financial services always feel a bit like Prince Tom when we do that I really like Prince formerly known as ** the prince formerly known now, Prince again. So if we ever do well, so, but yeah, it feels a bit weird. We’re in that transition phase of trying to get everything across to advisors assemble

Tom:
How long until you just change your name to that symbol.

Alex:
Take No, I’m enjoying the playfulness of the brand. Who was it? Dave Corbett didn’t realize it was a play on Avengers Assemble.

Tom:
Oh, yeah, I suppose.

Alex:
Shook my head. So for anyone that didn’t know that I’m a geek. Obviously, the Avengers are comic book characters who are heroes and we believe all people in front of servers are heroes and we want to assemble them together. That all works, isn’t it?

Tom:
Yeah, that’s good.

Alex:
And it gives me an excuse to use Marvel gifts all the time in the Facebook group.

Tom:
Yeah. Nice. And it gives me more context of those magnets you bought.

Alex:
Yeah, exactly. Yeah. So obviously, if you’ve seen any of my webinars or anything or stuff, I’ve got all sorts of I’ve got and people think that’s a fridge by the way,

Tom:
I can see why. Yeah.

Alex:
‘ve got the we’ve got this old retro metal filing cabinet that I’ve from the office that brought home and people and people thought it was a fridge and I thought I’d start working in the kitchen but the fridge magnets and I’ve got like yeah loads of like Thor, Iron Man, all sorts but I’ve got like the better future I’ve got loads of cool ones.

Tom:
And next to that filing cabinet, you do actually have a fridge.

Alex:
Which was what we had in the office we were having like sandwiches and stuff now I’m gonna be honest, does have gin and tonic not have that to be consumed during work hours. Obviously, I genuinely ** and there are some diet cokes in there. But yeah, that’s my office for everyone that didn’t care. But this week, Tom, we want to chat. So I got asked on LinkedIn DM for any advice for startups, basically, we get a lot of inquiries and people just starting out because you know, they want to get some leads, you know, they’ve just opened a mortgage business or protection or started doing activities or whatever and the first thing, you know, who am I going to advise I need people to speak to and I think a lot of people have their immediate, especially with the mortgage thing and protection. You’ve got your immediate family network and referrals. And I think people kind of get started with them, but it’s like, what can they do next? We’re kind of on this mission to disrupt the whole, you know, lead purchasing market because we think it’s easier to do yourself, but I can see if you’ve, I know a lot of people we spoke to they’ve like if they’ve worked maybe as a mortgage broker or advisor before and they’ve always been given leads. It’s kind of like we’ve got this whole new thing of like a new business, all these other things to think about. Like how do you get them? So I can imagine it being a bit of a minefield for people that don’t know what they’re talking about? Would you agree?

Tom:
Yeah, it’s pretty much starting up, who’s having the conversation where it’s, you’ve almost got to think in terms of where your resources are best placed. And I think that’s why we do a lot of what we do in terms of the, the advisors assemble community, in terms of trying to get people as set up as they can to market themselves as efficiently as they can I think efficiently is quite sort of the key word.

Alex:
Yeah.

Tom:
Making use of the best of their resources, whether it’s money or time and turning that into something that will actually give them that genuine output.

Alex:
I think it’s fair to say that we rarely work with startups people just starting out, because I think that a lot of the value that clients get from us is when they’re organically jumping Google for something, which is not an overnight thing. And so if you were to just invest in that you could be paying out money month a month waiting for that to happen. You’ve got no sort of back book to rely on. It’s a corner and it’s really hard for us to predict Had some had some calls today with people, you know who we’ve on boarded them, but having to say to them, yeah, I don’t know, this could be three months, it could be six months, the quickest we’ve done is six weeks. That is the exception, not the rule. And but put yourself in a start as a person starting out, I wouldn’t do it.

Tom:
No, there are no guarantees of it. And then you think about the Okay, so the other side of it’s like the paid outside, then you do need a bit of a bit of budget for that. And then when you think Okay, so then there’s a cost of goods on top of it. If your budget is perhaps on the lower side, then you’ve got then there’s the cost of those sort of things we perhaps better off potentially using the resources in advisors assemble. maybe haven’t yet taken the hits on your own time to do it yourself. But then using that budget that way.

Alex:
Because the way our pricing structure is at the minute we June 2020. At the moment we’ve got you would if you want to run out and you’ve got to pay us more because it’s more of our time to manage those ads for you and an advertising budget as well. So the costs are going up. If you’re starting out. A lot of people need the revenue. I think everyone’s in the mindset that if it’s working, I’ll get business in. I’ll put more money in, there’s no question. It’s like, how do you get to that? I think a lot of people need to maybe get via referrals or introduces, or ideally, like social media, or, I mean, we’ve done the whole Google Maps crash course that is a bit of a quick way to get something in first get the ball rolling, before sort of investing in someone else. So it’s a Yeah, it is difficult, very, very difficult. But on the flip side of that, that person, we did it in six weeks, they had an exit the domains, their URL, the website address had been around for, I can’t remember how many years but it’s an established site, although it wasn’t really ranking for anything had some age on it. I remember like one of the guys, someone we were talking about using the analogy of like, it’s like a fine wine. A domain name is like a fine wine that gets better with age. So it’s much easier for us to do what we do and do it quickly. Whereas we could do the same work with a brand new domain and have no effects.

Tom:
Yeah, not like that we defined in terms of getting Speaking the oldest domain, Google does like a domain that’s older because it suggests that it has a bit more authority. It’s been around for longer, it’s not sort of brand new. And that is one of the indicators Google uses in its ranking factors. And unfortunately, if you’re starting out and you just got a new domain, that untended that side of it, there’s not much you can do. To speed that up the entire iron has dissolved and does its thing with that.

Alex:
Absolutely. And then if people haven’t heard our bull seen one of our videos before, where we talk about this lead’s triangle, and as well as those who want to put it so when I do, so I do onboarding training. There’s one of the networks when they’ve got new recruits coming through and one of the things I pull out a triangle and sort of do is a bit of a warning that if someone’s selling cheap, fast leads, I would doubt the quality. It will be what you’re expecting there is that I suppose it’s kind of like someone’s selling remortgage leads for a fiver or something. I can imagine that being quite tempting. Mm hmm. I can also imagine it being a bit hit and miss because yeah, you can’t What out but I don’t think anyone that is ranking on Google that selling leads would sell them for five quid or they’ve got to make a margin as well so like how are they getting those details that can’t be from Google?

Tom:
No, that’s right. Yeah, as I say when you think in terms of in terms of So Google advertising for re mortgage keywords the absorb talking anywhere between 6 and 10 pounds a click so you’re definitely not gonna be selling the leads for five quid so it’s Where’s where are they coming from? Now there’s lots of other kind of like genuine sources, but it’s almost a bit like and you’d like to think these days are sort of behind in terms of what was like the old fashioned lead generation practices where people have loaded data during GDPR so I’ll put paid to this but we will just have a lot of data we email it farm it out, file links to it and everything else like that, that click that maybe will be used for this thing about survey data people would complete a survey so to win a competition and then the like that after answer a few questions at the bottom saying are you interested in mortgage advice and so on, just go Yeah, or whatever. And then that would actually classed as a mortgage loan which is scandalous, really when you think about it is in terms of the Is yeah crazy and they were they were the kind of leads and data that people itself anywhere between sort of 20 P and two pounds of lead they used to be the whole thing in terms of you could have for like data that have been sold once was like a pound sold twice with 50 P and the third times being sold was like 20 P or something. And it was just crazy. Yeah, unbelievable. So yeah, so people have to buy in bulk and then have like a dialer system anything yeah, no, I think for the most part those those days are behind that that kind of old fashioned lead generations result died out and it’s not something that we’ve we’ve ever really done thankfully for that suddenly quality over quantity in that respect.

Alex:
We’ve painted a bit of a dreary picture, Tom.

Tom:
Yes

Alex:
Probably let’s look at the bright side of things that you’ve got opportunities like I’ve done a Google Maps Crash Course it’s in the Facebook group, you can find it you’ll be able to find it under advisors symbol or lead generation financial services on Facebook, where it talks through the steps of what you can do the term mortgage broker, I think it’s searched for across the UK like over 100,000 times a month and everyone around the country gets a different result, depending on where they are, and then get and Google Maps is shown above that the top of Google Home doing the *** is the process that we’ve shared there that where you can be anything to. There’s some of the people with the feedback we’ve got they like within a week or so, they’ve been featured and they’ve not been featured before. Just following that process. I think we found anything between like four, four to six weeks of consistently following that process. So that’s a bit of a quick win. And then if you want so if you are a mortgage broker, if you are an IFA, if you do something that Google deems as a local service, whatever it is, if you don’t do mortgages or say life insurance, it doesn’t intrigue sounds like a national thing, doesn’t it?

Tom:
Yeah, it says things like say mortgage broker, mortgage advisor, financial advisor, they’re also clusters, kind of like local searches. And yeah, that huge value in terms of the Google My Business thing because the map comes above the search results.

Alex:
Yeah.

Tom:
So if you’re sort of doing you need to have a good website, everything else that goes with it, if you’re so active on the Google My Business, it pushes you up more on the maps and basically it pushes you to the top For the search term mortgage broker, because everybody’s search results for the term mortgage broker will be different depending on where they’re sitting. So yours will be wearing a different platform, obviously, we’re in different places, we’ll see a different search result. So we can basically capture the search result for the term mortgage broker, as you say, it’s 10s of thousands of searches a month, obviously, in each location might be shown 10s of thousands of times, but you aren’t where you are. If that makes sense.

Alex:
If you’re in a densely populated city, there’d be more people that see that whether you’re in a town in the middle of nowhere.

Tom:
Yeah. And if that all becomes an issue, then you think well, you might have to move.

Alex:
To get a virtual office in the city center. A lot of people do that as long as you for me when people ask me about that, there’s like if you’re in say, Bournemouth and you’re you can commute to Southampton, and Portsmouth. I don’t see it as dodgy practice to have a virtual address in or an address in each three of those cities. But if you’re in Southampton, and you want to get a virtual dress in Newcastle to get local leads I find that a bit not quite right.

Tom:
Yeah, that’s right, cuz you’re never gonna drive up. You’re never gonna be that local mortgage advisor. somebody did something contrary. So yeah, absolutely.

Alex:
That’s a bit of a quick win, I think. So you do need to, like say the website is so we’ve never been able to, we’ll never try and help anyone do that without a website. And then I doubt someone’s just going to, again, just call you off that Google without checking you out first as well. So I think a website for me is probably the most essential thing for new business. Would you agree?

Tom:
Yeah, definitely. Definitely. Definitely. In terms of because yeah, you everything else can be great. You know, you can be doing a low stance on social media and everything else like that and doing the Google My Business. But ultimately, they are well with Facebook, slightly different because people can do messenger, whatever. But I would say so nine times out of 10 somebody is going to land on your website. It’s really a case of if they don’t really like what you see they’re just going to bounce off. And so it’s kind of like that top of the funnel sort of side of everything else can be great if your website is really quiet, so lots of scratches. Maybe you perhaps like it to be Yeah, that is that is a huge blocker.

Alex:
Absolutely. And we found working with clients of all shapes and sizes that we can there are quick wins on the website that we can make that work. with existing visitors, we can increase the amount of leads that are coming through just by changing elements on the website. So it is really, really important what kind of things go on the website, where and how people can contact you, imagery, all sorts of different things. You sometimes like one word can make a massive difference. I agree. And I think there are people that do get leads from social media. I mean, I think Jim Smith would agree that he’s actually taken out the new website builder product, so he will have a much better looking website, but he’ll probably be the first to admit that his current previous website was not great. Putting it politely but he was getting leads through social media because he was very active on it doing lots of videos. I think you can do that. But you’re but the minute you stop, if you get busy and you haven’t got time, then that the taps are gonna turn off.

Tom:
Yeah, yeah, sure.

Alex:
So I think that’s why we want to get to the top of Google, it’s a little bit easier to sustain and keep that tap on with less efforts. I think that’s why we kind of pursue it a lot, don’t we?

Tom:
Yeah, no, actually And yeah, your websites will give you that kind of sustainability. But yeah, in terms of talking about the Facebook thing in terms of, you know, postings regularly, I’d almost say the website is the most important thing. And the second thing, if you’ve got time to work on it is producing good quality content. And that’s not the same as just pushing stuff out on Facebook, it’s actually spending the time with the content, whether it’s on the site, whether it’s on video, and think of it, get your content right first, and then use the channels, whether it’s you’ve got an email database, the compliantly use for pushing out and things like Facebook, LinkedIn, but just remember that Facebook, LinkedIn, the channels, and it’s what you’re putting out there, and what you’re saying is what counts making sure it’s, you know, it’s informative, people could trust it and really care about showcasing the expertise and they find it interesting and useful. Rather than just posting anything out just to make sure you hit the note three or four posts a week or whatever it is, some look to be more than that, but but focus more on the quality of the content that goes out rather than the quantity because otherwise it’s just step by step, just a bit bit of stuff like wasting time.

Alex:
Absolutely. And some of the mortgage networks will help supply content. I did these webinars for over a month and they had a loaded little content that you can use, and all these articles and things like that. I was like saying, you know, you got I got one of their PDFs, and I pulled out 5,6,7,8 social media posts, rather than just saying I’ll read this remortgage guide, I was like, well, this quote out of the copy of the bulk of the content, pulling out quote from it, did you know, blah, blah, blah. So it gave me a little bit and then like, how can you know if your network or the company working with is providing you with some content? How can you put your own spin on it? Like, could you even use that as a script and deliver that information on video as yourself or on audio or however, just to differentiate yourself from everyone else? Because if one of the networks is giving that to everyone in the network, then they’re all just thrown out. So how, you know you’re going to be chasing the same ever, you know, there’s no differentiation so why should they it’s that comes back to the slide that I use with all the agents Smith’s from the matrix is kind of like you’re all the same if you keep putting out the same content. So yeah, I would agree like spending a little bit of time putting out some quality content because you want people to trust you. And with all the time that no one’s no one wants financial advice from a stranger not going to do. It’s the biggest transaction of my life. Whenever I do it, the biggest amount of money, I’m not gonna do it with a stranger, someone I don’t trust or someone that I can’t get to know. I just wouldn’t do it.

Tom:
Yeah, that’s right. And it’s interesting, the point we’ll make in terms of sort of the network’s content, which is great. But yeah, it is important to add your own kind of comments and analysis on it in terms of what’s you know, in terms of it’s almost like factual news that’s come out in terms of for example, you always say when like the the base rate gets put up or down that sort of news, but then in terms of giving yourself a bit of a bit of opinion on why it’s good, or who it’s not potentially good for. And in terms of giving that a bit of extra adding value to it makes it yours. And also is worth saying that it when those kind of things come out and those kind of updates do come out, because I think some networks as well maybe provide them as links to content as well for them to sort of the contents got to be on your own site, and you’ve got to sort of turn it into something that is that is original as well. It’s just coming straight off, then Google sort of sees straight through it, and I’ll have no value. So you’ve got to go through the effort of making your own putting on your own site. Because the other thing is, is that a lot of people on so like, a lot in social media, they just share, like the BBC News link or whatever, because they think, Oh, yeah, I’m getting that news out there. But it’s pointless, because no one’s no one’s really engaging with your brand. If they click on the BBC News link, you know, no one’s gonna pick up the phone to you from the BBC news website. So that it’s all got to be everything’s got to be going back to your site. And that’s why we don’t really do too many posts. The only exception is from the social media side when we will post reviews as we’ll always tend to put the URL on there. But But always every post that we just try and push out always directs back to a certain piece of content, because we sort of think Yeah, you’ve got such a better chance of So building that trust and that online rapport for us have a better on the website, than you have necessarily just stuck in Facebook. So when someone gets distracted, go somewhere else. But once you’re on the site, and you can do a lot more with it, you can then if you had a bit of budget, you could remark it to them, which is something that we I think we’d probably agree on that if you have a really small budget that you can potentially pull out even you know, you’re looking as low as one or two pounds a day, put it into remarketing people that land on your site that don’t turn into leads, they’ve already engaged with you once so you’re not you’re sort of maybe targeting a lot of smaller amounts of people, but you’re getting in front of them more times. So yeah, that’s one of the other things that I would probably recommend to start with if you’ve got a spare sort of 30 quid a week, or 30 quid a month sorry, investments and remarketing.

Alex:
So yeah, that’s one of the other things of that I would probably recommend to start with if you’ve got a spare sort of 30 quid a week, or 30 quid a month sorry, investments and remarketing Well, if you compare that the 30 pounds a month cost to actually be remembered, say like people been to your site and actually come back and remember against for free posting that link sending people to BBC, here are your like, there’s no comparison to what you’re wasting time. You know, no one’s going to remember a bit. Ah, thanks, Dave for sharing their boozy news. This is not going to happen. So yeah, I think the two of the most important things and then get the website sorted and then we probably need to talk in a little bit more detail the options there would have thought because all we’ve said is Yeah, have a nice website.

Tom:
Yeah.

Alex:
And then again, sort of like spending Some time on your content as well. So with the website options, I think when we spent years trying to work out a service to offer people that were starting out, I mean, we’d like it was a difficult one I think we’re I think we’ve cracked it now with the new sort of website builder but you can have that we’ve got like these templates that are based on work that we know kind of work so when we’re talking about having a website that works we’ve got the templates that you can use with the tutorials that go with it, but there are cheaper options than that as well. You can use I mean, like GoDaddy have a website builder, which is super cheap. I got the zombie you’ve got Squarespace, Wix all of those.

Tom:
Speak of is really we paid about seven quid a month for this I think.

Alex:
Yeah, Google My Business do have like a website on my phone is going to go off. Now I’ve said the G word. They have a thing that you can build a website in there as well. So if you just want a digital business card, and you’re not going to get it I’m like guys yet the content sounds great. I’ve got no time for it. This for free or much much cheaper options to get something that just looks because someone like someone knows me some today they had a GoDaddy website and he was saying no no it doesn’t look good on me I’ve seen a lot worse a lot worse so there’s plenty of options there you don’t have to spend a lot of money.

Tom:
And also I think we’d always almost say the first it’s almost make you make your site set up to convert as well in terms of because because unfortunately, some of the the best design websites aren’t like ours don’t always convert into leads that way they look fantastic and they maybe have some sort of you know, great features and everything else like that but sometimes it’s harder and and we and we find as we do with kind of the the website builder stuff in terms of you can’t really believe beat sticking a form in the top right of the banner. There it was. It doesn’t look amazing. There are better looking websites. They look pretty good but they’re out there you know, you can’t deny that. They’re off to fancier websites, certainly, but they’re not functional. They don’t. They don’t turn, learn, visit and delete as well.

Alex:
If we let our designer just off the shackles just make our clients look beautiful. We would be sacked within a couple of months for not generating any business because they would look amazing. But I’d rather not look as good and have more clients. And I’m sure I presume everyone else is the same.

Tom:
Yeah. And it seems like the sites would be slow, because of the way they kind of like that lack of the kind of that kind of stuff in the sites but aren’t they probably the minimalist content as well. It wouldn’t rank for anything, they’d look amazing, but they just they just would not perform.

Alex:
So plenty of options with the website stuff. I’ve got the I haven’t published it yet. So I’ve got a link or anything but I have converted those webinars that I’ve done during lockdown for the network’s into an online course. And there was a quite a large section about website wins, and that I’m making that completely effort free. That is very soon. So I did for one of the networks. I did four and a half hours worth of webinars with them. And I’ve pulled out the best bits and streamline that into an online course to really generate startup costs and there is definitely a section on the website with the examples of the form in the top right corner and all the other bits as well. So actually, we probably should have just made this episode about that whole process. But in fact we do cover off the Google Maps in there that’s in there trying to get people to use their personal brand. Because I think as I said, it means no one to buy anything was stranger so if I had to go back to the guy who asked me on LinkedIn, he’s got himself out there. So I would like one thing I’d say is get like when the world gets back to normal and you’re comfortable being around other people, I think the best investment would be like a photo shoot, okay, and some quality images so you don’t have to use stock images on the website. I think that’s one of the things I would do.

Tom:
Yeah.

Alex:
One of the things that I’m probably gonna get we’ve got our own cameras and stuff like that we’ve got decent ones, but I’m probably going to invest in doing like a proper going into the studio and get some stuff done. I hate like I say someone again, *** like I would you know, I’m an introvert at heart. I’d be quite happy like for people not to know who I am, or see me like ever, but trust is what builds relationships, relationships build sales, and I think all the financial services, the financial advisors, that’s what if they build trust, they’ll make sales. So **, can you do that? So rather than looking if you’re just starting out, rather than looking at what are the best quick like tips for best what the best practices actually just think what can I do to build trust before unlike online at scale? And then that should, everything should follow. There’s all like sort of tactics and stuff, but I think that’s ultimately the key.

Tom:
Yeah, let me run in terms of thing about like you mentioned earlier about the whole Agent Smith thing in terms of the good thing about your personal brand that put your personality across is that that is what differentiate can differentiate financial advisors and mortgage brokers because a lot of them who else obviously some focus on different things, but to kind of consider consumers eyes, the majors look and think lots of people look the same or lots of brokers seem the same. But putting your personality across it’s it’s quite a differentiator in terms of sort of the type of person you are, what they expected that if they were to call or to deal with you, and essentially kind of, you know, the conversations you’d have and ultimately how you’d get on with each other to a degree. So yeah, I think that that personal branding element is very important in the absence of an end, sorry absence of any kind of loads of real negative branding budget using your own personality is a great way to do it.

Alex:
But it’s really difficult. It’s no it’s one of the things that’s easy, but it’s really difficult. I remember just starting like you have to take I’ve taken baby steps baby steps, baby steps and still feel like there’s loads more I could do but I remember like first doing videos and feeling really awkward with it and feeling really awkward put my photograph on the website. So I think it’s like don’t try and copy you know, someone like Poland or Alex Curt or someone like that who’s already comfortable with it, like try and try and do those little baby steps because it is really it is really awkward. And then even a year or two of doing that then actually brings out the personality out more so actually, like now people know that I love Batman Benjin like I would have been afraid to be that much myself. Even like six months ago probably.

Tom:
Yeah.

Alex:
It is a difficult thing.

Tom:
Yeah. And I think it’s just like just not being afraid to practice. Even if you don’t do your own videos, you think no one is ever going to see these instead of just just do a few and just see how it goes. You’ll eventually and I think, yep, you’ll eventually just become more natural. Okay? It’s amazing. I find it quite bold. So all right when we say when we’re in the office instead of doing the videos there, but if I saw, I have to sit on my own and do like a screenshot for somebody and then comment on the screenshots, show them how to do something that’s a nightmare. After about three or four things I’ve done millions of times, but it’s all in the start again. Yeah, and it’s just because I’m not used to it. I mean, standing in front of a camera and also having the conversation and something is arguably probably better suited to an introvert, doing a screen share. Again, just talking and actually talking to anybody, you just sort of explaining what you’re doing and pointing and clicking like you do anything. Now. I guess we’ll get really tongue tied with it. And it’s just practice. Yeah, it’s just practice and then start, you know, do a few videos, show them to, you know, family and friends or whatever. And I think they’ll probably be surprised at the feedback and will probably be better than you may think as well. And that’s just people being nice.

Alex:
Yeah, definitely. And also So I’m just going to, I’ve had an email from one of our clients who did their first podcast interview with me and I want to get her exact words if I can. Yeah, listening to the podcast that he sent across was pleasantly surprised as I had worried I hadn’t prepared and that it would all sound awful. So yeah, listen to it back. And that’s the benefits. I suppose we, our editor will cut out arms and arms and things like that we think but you always think you’re gonna be worse and you’re always over analyzing. It definitely says you’ll be pleasantly surprised when people don’t care. They don’t expect you to be like an actor or act or sorry. They just came out like they’re, they’ve got a problem and they need your help. Can you help them? Do you seem like a genuine person? Who cares? You know that the last thing they’re looking at is your performances. You will analyze it more than anyone watching.

Tom:
Yeah, that’s right. It’s about the content first, and then I was like the showmanship of it. Second, if the content is good, it’s interesting and it answers problems or queries or if the requirement for information that people have is yeah, you probably do need to have come across, you know, in a reasonably engaging manner. But that comes with practice and it’s and people will get it.

Alex:
So social media platforms for people like starting out I think another reason why we
sort of don’t really work with startups is they don’t really have any content to begin with. Yeah, we’ve got to create the content to then be able to create the social media posts, and then you’re starting from zero following so even if we’re putting something out, no one’s gonna see it. So it is like, where do you start? So for me, if I was starting out, if I was a mortgage broker or equity release advisor, I would leverage my friends and post out as me on my personal Facebook page and say, like, hey, I’ve just qualified as a mortgage broker is how can I help people? Could you, you know, share out this is what I can do. And this is why I think LinkedIn works really well because I don’t if they’ve done this intentionally or not, but posting out your company on LinkedIn is terrible. Like you just get no reach but you get loads of reach posting as your itself and that’s what it’s designed for. And then I think that’s because it is you rather than a logo sending it out, I think that’s why people comment more. There’s more conversations happening on LinkedIn. But I think people use their Facebook page too much rather than, in fact, one of the guys on one of the webinars, you know, that three, four part series on the first one I talked to, I made this comment about using yourself and he’d been posting out on his company page for ages and then he posted out as himself, and then he got a life insurance lead from it. Someone had quoted more Khurram, how much it was through the estate agent. He quoted less. He got a really chunky life insurance deal, I think was like 70 or 60 pound a month. Just and the reason he got that was because of pushing out on his personal Facebook rather than the company one.

Tom:
Yeah, great.

Alex:
And he was like it was Alex is just for that. I was like, Well, I didn’t do that. You just did it because he was just before he was posting out as he has his logo, there was no low as it was, there was no personality, there was no who is the person I’m going to speak to, you know, it’s nothing. It’s just so much more powerful coming from the person.

Tom:
Yeah. 100% Yeah, without any kind of like the resources to really sort of push like a, you know, a heavier advertising strategy. Using your own personal brand is a really good way to differentiate.

Alex:
So I think Facebook is good as a person as art. That’s what I would do and LinkedIn. I find with Instagram, because you can and we were talking earlier about linking back to your website, you can link out and other than in the DMS there is a strategy you could use with Instagram stories, get them into your DMS by their link out with a lot of heavy lifting. Whereas with I think Facebook and LinkedIn, they obviously want to keep people on their platform rather than on your website. So don’t do it all the time. But that’s, as you said earlier, that’s the ultimate goal. Get them back to your website again, have a look around and this is why I guess come back to why you want to create content so they can get to know you a little bit more and then inquire m uch warmer lead. So I think that’s where I would go, would you Facebook and LinkedIn it?

Tom:
Yeah, definitely, definitely have Yeah. And then the good bits of different ways, Facebook’s quite good in terms of sort of the reach and everything else that goes with it. And LinkedIn is quite good. If you have good quality content on LinkedIn, it sticks around the guy I see. So a lot of weeks. Yeah, yeah, literally four weeks. And which makes it almost good value in the sense that it’s face to face with a probably a bit of a shorter lifespan, whereas I could have gone LinkedIn and I see something. Yeah. So two weeks ago, you think that’s crazy. But yeah, both of those are quite good news is levering that kind of a your own sort of personal network as best you can start with, and I think, particularly Facebook, if you’re starting out as well. And it’s something that I think I’d be almost too shy to do to start with, but he’s asking people to share your stuff. And I don’t think that people want to do that. Do they want to meet people? Surprisingly nice.

Alex:
Especially your friends.

Tom:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And then it does. It does work and in terms of when you actually think in terms of five shares, I don’t know The average friendship of any sort depends on who you’ve got but in terms you know you’ve got potentially thousands and thousands of impressions there just from like immediate friends and family they can make a huge difference and also it’s kind of a way of getting almost like a call for referral it’s almost say if I my my other friend who asked me to there was a mortgage broker asked me to sort of show stuff and I was happy to do it then I’ll do it and then all of a sudden the mind network mental sees that I think up will Tom trusts him to do whatever and then we’ll go that way then it’s kind of it’s almost like that that kind of it’s the the endorsement side of it from somebody that they perhaps trust which sort of gets you halfway in the door it’s almost it’s obviously not not as good value as a referral because you need somebody referral obviously someone’s in the context of needing a mortgage now but it’s certainly someone someone that all peace of mind that you know, yeah, if such and such as use him, then I’ll do that because he has a mortgage and he has a house.

Alex:
Yeah, exactly. And I think as I know, a lot of people don’t want to bug their friends and they Yeah, when this comes up, there aren’t normal friends. I just don’t do it too often, but there’s just that they will forget. They will forget what you did. So, gentle reminders, you can also with Facebook exclude a list of friends, if you want to as well. But yeah, don’t overdo it, don’t try and sell it. But if it’s stuff that’s interesting, like, did you know or have you heard and it is genuinely interesting, then why would that bug them?

Tom:
Yeah. And that’s and that’s where it goes into that quality content. And if you’re not, not in terms of bits in terms of actually putting that information out there on social channels, it’s easy for people to share, because people are happy to share it to their network and think, oh, that’s pretty so inoffensive. And it’s actually pretty useful. So I’m going to do that. Whereas if you just put out a post saying, oh, call me for mortgage advice, you’ll think Well, I’m not sure I want I’m not sure I want to spam my network with that was it was just running information, then it’s a really good way to do it.

Alex:
So the other thing I would say to avoid, and I hope this doesn’t happen anymore, with like, GDPR is like and we sort of touched on earlier, like, I think people like a ton of people sell data anymore, but like if anyone’s offering you a like a database for you to email out to feel like people do actually try and sell that to me all the time, actually. So they might say like, I just Don’t think that’s a great your that’s spam you know your spam whether it’s in I’m doing bunny ears whether it’s opt in data they haven’t opted in for you specifically to email them but don’t waste your time or money on on emailing people they’ve never heard of you before. is one bit of advice I’d give to anyone. Stop or not stop or not don’t.

Tom:
Yeah, absolutely it’s it’s it’s kind of the time and effort that goes into it. They don’t know who you are. It is unsolicited. I’m not really trying to get away with selling that data anymore because I think I thought it was a case of you had to consent for that exact company. Yeah. Your personal data so I have to you have to consent that exact company to talk to you not just partners have to Yeah, no, I yeah, I’d say I agree with you, then I wouldn’t I wouldn’t go near that.

Alex:
Is there anything else that you would definitely avoid? Or definitely do? Starting out very mindful budgets and things like that.

Tom:
Big one for me, I think is as we touched upon, but Google My Business came up is a really good way. Get on those maps and just keep doing it as frequently as you can. It’s a great way So push yourself right to the top of rankings are relevant search terms, our mortgage broker mortgage advice financial advisor at gate costs you nothing to do and just puts in the time.

Alex:
And it’s not a lot of time either.

Tom:
Yes, that’s right.

Alex:
When the quick genuinely one of the quickest wins and no one no one bothers doing it, like so do it. I know some people that are like in very busy cities that I absolutely live off the inquiries that they get off. Yeah, of those because they’re there, you know. So even if it accounts for 10%, or gives you an extra deal a month or or whatever, it’s, it’s worth the small. It’s an app. And there’s a process that you can do weekly that will take you 30 seconds to a minute.

Tom:
Early does I think I’d put something out. Yeah, even more more frequently than that. If you can just yeah, just just google on Google. My business is a great way because he talks about things like the remarketing. Yeah, obviously the website is important, but you need a bit of resource to sort of have a bit of money to do this. So the site builder we tried to we made that as cheap as we possibly can, I think Yeah, but in terms of Yeah, and because because we still talk about remarketing, but you use remarketing You need to remarket to to start with and so you need a bit of traffic from somewhere it’s just thinking what’s the most cost effective way of getting through it.

Alex:
So check it out it’s a so that Crash Course is in the Facebook group is a Google Maps Crash Course is part of my lead generation start course I will share the links out for those and then I will put the link in the show notes as soon as we’ve published that that is literally happening I think I’ve done it all now so I’m not stuck or still a little cheeky intro for us that is going to be published I literally just don’t have the link as we record now but that is available so if but all just join the Facebook group just ask where’s the where’s the Google Maps course because the Google Maps Crash Course sorry because that is a 10 minute video that it will be worth the 10 minutes watching it. On the percent on the website stuff we’ll monitor weather again that is in the starter course I suppose when we need to do a crash course on that really because it was as we were recording that episode. earlier. I think in all we’re just saying do a good website but what actually is What are the fundamentals of a good one?

Tom:
We sort of touched upon it very briefly in terms about into the data capture in the form stuff. So yeah, no, I think you’re right in terms of what a good website is, I suppose a little bit you almost need visuals to go with it. Is it?

Alex:
Yeah, so I’ve got to create some sort of PDF again, it is in the startup course. Yeah, I do some of that. So maybe I just need to share that to people. But yeah, hopefully we’ve covered why it’s difficult for an agency or even a freelancer to help someone starting out you kind of need to get the ball rolling yourself I think to make it to leverage someone else to come and help you think is that’s the it’s really difficult bit and it’s just time consuming thing but you know, with I think using your your personal brand on social and Google My Business and just a little bit on the website, you can get yourself in a position to start generating your own business and then when it’s not do or die in terms of your budget, you’ve got that room to kind of invest and grow then then it’s good time to start looking at a partner to help you, I think.

Tom:
Yeah, I think well, when Yeah, when you’re ready to sort out the next one, I think I think one of brokers only bid too busy to do this themselves. You have to think that then in that they’re eventually going to get to that point where the pipeline starts to move through. And that’s not making enough money from the deals that they’ve got. Maybe it’s all about getting outsourced that side of things. So they can just focus on the mortgages.

Alex:
But if you’re investing when you’re marketing, you need to pay off in the same month, I’d say you shouldn’t invest that.

Tom:
Yeah.

Alex:
As a rule.

Tom:
Yeah, there’s no guarantees. And also it does tend to take time to get going, whether that’s in terms of finding the rights or what formula is going to work because it’s different each time with different brands. And then the SEO Yeah, vary, you’re definitely not going to get any SEO benefit in that first month.

Alex:
Cool. I think we have covered off war, some advice for startups, it’s applicable for everyone. I think the rules are almost the same. And so yeah, I think that was a good one. Any final thoughts? Have we summarized it brilliantly? Yeah, that’s amazing.

Tom:
Actually, only one little additional thing I thought was in terms of actually getting on into the early as you come with reviews, what is Google reviews or saying have a free trustpilot account or something in many cases and obviously real reviews because Google and trustpilot do see through FIFA.

Alex:
And we’ve probably mentioned this on the podcast before Do not you can hire actors to do fake reviews and they are so fake. That’ll do more damage than good. But we have scheduled our whole episode on which review platform to go for and other if you do watch Joe lice, it’s got your back and if you watch that as there was a whole thing about trustpilot on there like how easy it was to set up a fake business. It was a water filtration business but it was a sieve. And it was so easy it was for me to get position one in all these categories for reviews for something that is a sieve a colander It was a colander, okay, he’s selling it and he said yeah, as I say he was kind of like how it was like, I presume people have forgotten about it. Now at the time I thought all dears you trustpilot was going to become less trustworthy, but it is a good one. Yeah, that’s going to be coming up very soon a whole and we’ve actually got input from listeners on that. And we’ve got some audio clips from listeners on. Some of the people that have been around for a while why they use trustpilot or why they use or any of the other’s company many of top my head unbiased, FIFA or whatever. So yeah, that is coming soon. So yeah, definitely get those reviews in our, for me, I like the Google ones for SEO, but I think we’ll save that conversation for another day.

Tom:
Yeah, agreed. Sounds good.

Alex:
Cool. Nice one. If you’re not in the Facebook group, join it advisors assemble or lead generation for financial services. We’re in there. Say hello. Come say hi.

Tom:
Yeah.

Alex:
See you next week.

Tom:
See you next week. See you in the group.

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