089 – Essential Website Tools For Financial Advisers

089 - Essential Website Tools For Financial Advisers
089 - Essential Website Tools For Financial Advisers

Alex:
Hello, and welcome back to the Advisor’s Assemble Podcast previously known as Lead Generation Financial Services. That’s me and Tom back again, due to pop I was going to say due to popular demand, but that is not always the case. But we put a little poll in the Facebook group and I asked people or should send my phone off, not professional. I’m going to do that. Now. We asked everyone I will I asked everyone what their sort of favourite is it kind of links into what we’re talking about today. So we’re gonna be talking about website tools and looking at stats and things like that. And if I just went from the data, I would get a different result from actually asking the people so if I go look at the top 10 downloaded episodes of all time, you and I feature on there once and the other nine are advisors or people that are brokers, advisors, etc. But having asked the community what they like marketing experts comes top on this new marketing experts in the top 10. So it’s not always the amount of downloads that is there the right answer.

Tom:
Are they also kind of the advisors wants the oldest ones as well though.

Alex:
No, not necessarily.

Tom:
Okay, I was gonna say that because they’re the oldest so they’ve had a lot they’ve been on for longer so therefore naturally, I guess you download.

Alex:
I guess you download some of them, some of them are but there was one from January this year. Now that is in the top 10 it was like fourth I think.

Tom:
Oh, wow. Okay, yeah.

Alex:
Not necessary. Yeah, not necessarily. So it’s interesting. I always struggled with getting those guests on whether people, because the numbers were never as good one, got a guest on So what could be is that an advisor who’s never maybe never been on a podcast before tells all their friends and their friends have never heard seen them on a podcast before. So they’ll go download it and then never listen to anything else. And that’s where you get like a maybe a spike for that particular episode. So we’re gonna link into a little bit talking about some of the tools we were talking about. It’s not always about this qualitative and quantitative, but dude, definitely, we should pull out really nice comments on because you’re quite good apparently but a bit of a fast talker.

Tom:
Yeah, too much of a bass fitter is a problem, isn’t it. My long-ago rap career I’d come back to home in more ways than one.

Alex:
So what we’re going to we speak gonna speak to the editor and reduce your audio speed by 10 so that you’re more coherent makes this just God blah blah blah blah blah blah

Tom:
He won’t meet you as I’m going to speak like this. I’m gonna make a conscious decision. Yeah.

Alex:
I think we both to be fair, I think we both do especially well, like canonical does as well.

Tom:
I’m particularly bad yeah, I am particularly bad,

Alex:
But we’re all good. So we’re gonna try our best today this is gonna be our best ever episode and we’re talking about website tools. So I know a lot of people have been looking at getting a new website or even if you haven’t, just making sure we’re going to talk about three particular tools one slash two are essential and one is good to have but I think even Yeah, I mean the amount of times that we will work with a client no matter what size it is often interesting how to like some of them don’t have Google Analytics on there already be like the absolute must-have, I think.

Tom:
No, absolutely. Yeah. I think no one’s going to look at our Google Analytics, Google Search Console and a program called Hot Jar. So yeah, Google Analytics is we would say, probably the most important, that’s the one that shows you what’s going on with your website. So basically, I can show you some of it’s you can get as little as basic or as deep into it as you want. But broadly speaking, it shows you who is visiting your website, obviously, not actually who but it gives you an idea of kind of the audience that it’s attracting how they’re getting there, the channels we’re using, whether that’s social or Google or direct or paid advertising, the behaviour shows you what they do when they’re on the site that can be the pages they visit, how they move through the site. So if they visit one page, where do they go after that, and also, probably one of the most important things it gives you is it tracks where your website leads and conversions come from a form that can track conversions whether it’s through a button click or through a thank you URL it basically you can say, Okay, yeah, we can see you’ve had five leads yesterday to it from Google paid ones from organic, and another two from social. So it just basically gives you a really good overview. And what I like about it is you can go as in-depth, you know, even if you were just sort of quite wanting to look over it from a basic point of view, you’ll get a lot out of it. But at the same time, if you sort of wants to get into the really really granular detail of attributed conversions and things like that, then you can do that as well.

Alex:
Absolutely. And a big plug for my Free Online Lead Generation Start Course which I released this week. I do do a crash course on Google Analytics just looking at what like the one of them if you do if it looked really confusing because the amount of all the settings there are and all the different views there are of just the kind of the basic stuff they’ll look at just to let you say just see where traffic’s coming from. Because I mean we’re going to do I think the next one we’re going to record whether it’s released in this order is called Social Media is Sexy but SEO Pays the Bills. We love the catchy title off because a lot of people you know if you’re spending a lot of time or people ask, you know, should I be on LinkedIn should be on Facebook actually just having a look at Google Analytics will tell you specifically for you what’s been working what’s not what’s kind of good, what’s not in terms of getting traffic to your website won’t it

Tom:
Yeah, absolutely. In terms of one of the one, I say it’s not frustrating per se if you are getting a number of leads to your website and you’re doing a lot of things whether it’s social, organic, or paid or paid advertising and you don’t know where they’re coming from, it gives you a real sort of headache in terms of understanding what’s working well and what isn’t having a properly configured analytics, which again, doesn’t really take a lot of work Google does most of the hard work for you until you get the tracking code on there and it tracks most of it without you having to do too much you need to set up your goals obviously ultimately it kind of tells gives you that inflammation that insight of what’s working what isn’t so you know, okay, well I can either invest more in this whether that be time or money i can see this is working or okay, so this is working well. So I’m just gonna let that run but my money you know, organic social I do a lot of that, but I don’t really seem to get much out of it in terms of leads the stuff I post, I don’t get much traffic from it. So you may want to think about how you structure those social posts. Or maybe you get a lot of clicks, but the bounce rates are really high. So that’s people that will land on the site and golf straight away without doing anything. So you could start saying, Okay, is there a bit of a disconnect, than between either my ad or my post? And the destination that people land on? Is it or is there a problem with some potentially how it looks? Does it not load on mobile particularly? Well, people often have a habit of looking at their own website on a desktop, because they do it when they’re at work, or whatever. And it’s quite easy to forget to look at it on mobile, which, you know, we tend to find it’s so 50% of users join, so 50% of users use to view websites. And also you can see that in analytics, how many people actually look at your website through various different devices.

Alex:
No. Absolutely. I was gonna say a lot of this is you can people sort of asking us our opinion, you know, you know, how many people do you think will go on my website on mobile, like, well, if your analytics installed, you can see rather than just assuming, and some people are different, like beat a lot of b2b stuff. We’ve got b2b business and there’s more predominantly on desktop, and we find actually little things like because we track all the way to a sale, do the best applications or leads come from mobile, or desktop. And if you’re running ads, you can then adjust your bidding, eradicate any mobile users in terms of ads, if you want it to if the data is telling you that they’re not as good as you, your desktop stuff.

Tom:
Yeah, absolutely. And we do do that for a number of campaigns, we’ve switched mobile off, in some instances, it can produce a lot of leads, but for the product that it is those people that sort of maybe coming through mobile, sometimes they’ve been, it’s been a struggle to get hold of them afterwards. Whereas those on a desktop as soon as the lead drops in, they know they’re sat down, they know they’re, you know, in front of the computer, delivering them straight away and the contact rates great, whereas on the mobile that may be a bit out and about or certainly in particular times as well. That’s the other thing. You know, you’ve often seen that particularly from a b2b point of view. The use of desktop is obviously peaking sort of during those nine to five hours, but then mobile and tablet takes over then in the evening, which is completely unsurprising when we think about you know, What we do ourselves?

Alex:
Absolutely.

Tom:
So yeah, the device thing is really important because it gives you a lot of insight back on, you know, if your website is performing well, or not well, on various devices, whether it’s desktop, mobile, or even tablet, it also gives you information on things like where people are searching from the ticket if you’re focusing on local stuff you’ll be able to see in terms of I think you can see is down to the town and city within a reasonable radius, where were people landing on your site from which still can be useful. If you saw between a few different towns and cities and all that for you. Maybe you’re in a satellite town, maybe, and you want to get more traffic from the city, maybe you can see if that is or isn’t being successful.

Alex:
We can tell you a lot of the people I can see why people do get overwhelmed with it, but a lot of people will want to see all that information. So I guess the basics then, do you think for someone that is, you know, not really look, they’ve got it installed. They’re not really looked at it before. I probably look at, obviously, how many people session duration and we probably should explain. I know a lot of people don’t know what the bounce rate is, we should probably explain what the bounce rate is, what that means and what implications that have Do you think?

Tom:
Yeah, so so that bounce rate, it’s one where it’s essentially someone landing on the website, and then going off without interacting with it, it basically sorts of gives you an idea of what has the basic idea of the quality of your website for the traffic that’s coming to it. So if you have a high bounce rate as a percentage, so say if you have organic traffic, you’d probably want to bounce rate of around, so maybe, I don’t know 50%, which may sound quite high, but it’s almost like a numbers game. I always think people may find that a website conversion rate of 5% is really low, but it’s actually pretty good. It’s just the nature of humans and how we sort of engage with stuff online. But yeah, that’s basically what the bounce rate is. One thing is worth mentioning, I think, because I think that’s something that you use before as well in terms of you can if people if someone scrolls on the website, then that doesn’t count as a bounce because you can land on a page digest all the information by actually clicking on anything you know, had a long time on the site gone straight away and some configurations may class as a bounce, which is maybe a little bit unfair.

Alex:
Yeah, exactly. I was gonna make that point that someone could if they’ve seen your if you’ve linked out from abroad posts off something about a specific topic. And they’ve gone on and they’ve read all that and they’ve digested that information just happens that they don’t, they’ve been on your website before, they don’t need to go and look around, look at anything else and leave, that’s still a good user that’s maybe spent a minute or two reading. So there are, you can set up events on scrolls or scrolls down to percent as your page. So this is probably for people that are getting, you know, thousands of visits a week and need to look at this like the bigger, bigger plays, I’d say to add that so more detail if you get like real return on investment or a really understanding whether campaigns working or not, but yeah, you’re right. So bounce rate is you could have a page that’s got 100% bounce rate doesn’t mean it’s not a good, good page, people are just getting everything they need there and leaving. So it’s not all sort of be all end all. But you’re right. Yeah, I think the having that benchmark of like 50% on the organic side, certainly. And sometimes you find me like paid traffic, you’ll get high bounce rate because you’re actually choosing what page you want them to go to, and then that should match exactly what they’ve done. In fact, there’s an instance where a high bounce rate can be better than the lower one because if you say you’re doing a, an advert for a remortgage for home improvements, and you send them to your homepage, rather than your remortgage or home improvements page as they go on the homepage, and they can see every mortgage page or something, they may click on the homepage. And then they may get to click a few times never find what they actually wanted and go away that will not have a bounce over if the if you send them to directly to the page that they want this just as a thought, well, that’s good. I might come back to that later and contact a person, later on, then that will collapse as a bounce, but it’s obviously a better experience

Tom:
Yes, this is strange is a strange one, isn’t it? Yeah. And then we sort of look at, we look at things like bounce rates as a bit of a kind of in-between metric and that in terms of pages per session and sort of session durations. Obviously, the first one we look at is what’s the conversion rate of traffic to leads. Then we also consider the opposite of cost of that traffic and that’s how we’ll get rid of an idea of the cost per lead. And then further on from that, what’s the cost per sale but yeah. Those sort of metrics just gives you a bit of an idea of the quality of the traffic that’s coming through. So you may have some campaigns that we run, and we sort of look at everything, the conversion rate isn’t quite what we want it to be. And we still want to look at why the next step is we’d sort of look at that those bounce rate pages per set per session and the average session duration. And sometimes we sort of sit and think, okay, the conversion rates, not quite what we want it to be. But these behavioural metrics, bounce rate pages per session, average session durations are all quite good. So that suggests that the content is right, but they’re just not ready to turn into a lead yet. They’re finding the information they want or they’re quite happy navigating the site, but they’re just not ready to make an inquiry. So you start to think, okay, depending on where that traffic’s coming from, if it’s a paid campaign, you’ve also got to marry up Okay, so we’re providing the right information, but they’re just not in that purchase point yet. You have to make a bit of a call of Okay, is the traffic worthwhile in the sense that we can then get them into the remarketing list and then potentially catalogue or pick them up and maybe you know, in the neck in the following weeks and months, or is it a case of Okay, this traffic is actually a bit expensive for something that’s not ready to convert yet anything, Okay, we’re gonna have to have a look something else.

Alex:
I mean, it’s a great is an absolute, an essential tool that I think is great. No matter where you are in your business just starting out, you know, is good, even if you think I’m not going to have time to look at this, get it installed now Is it okay? We’ll capture that data and keep it forever. And it’s a great benchmark, especially if we’re going to start hiring someone to work on the marketing, you can actually clearly see and compare what they’ve been doing to what you’ve done. If you’re paying someone you know, whatever it is a month to work on something and those results have not been you can go and compare back to when you were managing it and say, Oh, hang on a minute, I’m paying you x y, z, and these this were the stats before here they are after this, something’s not going quite right that may actually lead quite nicely on to a search console, in terms of if you’re investing in SEO and things like that, because search console is another Google tool, but it rather than showing how people are performing on your website. It’s more how your website is performing in Google search results, right?

Tom:
Yeah, absolutely. So, yeah, as you’ve just said, Google Analytics is about what’s happening on your site. Whereas search console is about how your site is performing on Google. We mentioned other tools as well that we use that complements that when we talk a lot about sem rush, which is very useful for us and there’s a few others but Google Search Console is very useful because it’s sort of it’s it’s kind of your only sort of, I’m not sure the right term is almost a window into Google and how your site performs on Google so it gives you a lot of really useful information so a lot of the ones will a lot of the pieces of info we’ll look at things like impressions and clicks so impressions map shows how many times you know your you’ve been seen in a search result on Google and for what search terms the clicks opposite shows, where your clicks are coming from, and the various keywords the click-through rates, etc. And also it gives you like an average position as well which is used we like to use sem rush for the average positions only really because it’s just easier to see and easier to digest. But you can get that same information in Search Console. It also shows you first of all any problems and any coverage errors. Is there anything that’s stopping your site from being sure Shown on Google as well as it can be, could be issued with a sitemap or pages not being indexed when they should be. And it basically just gives you that window into and that that insight into if your site isn’t performing as well on Google as you’d want it to be, is there any kind of really obvious errors, that sort of holding it back? It won’t give you sort of all the answers for good SEO, but it basically highlights your performance and any problems is probably the easiest way to show it. It’s not like an SEO SOP instruction manual. But it basically tells you are there any problems and basically, how your website performs on Google search? I think a lot of people sort of know about it internally. I know, people really know of analytics, a lot more is more commonly used. But Search Console, I think is much rarer, rare, really, if that’s a word. So we know like a lot. There’s some Google Analytics are not installed. But I know that the percentage of Google Search Console is being used is much, much lower. Yeah, definitely. And it’s and it’s arguably more important. Well, it all depends in terms of you’ll probably get in if you don’t have Search Console set up but you have analytics set up, you can get to the data from analytics. But if your website isn’t performing well on Google, what data are you really going to have to look at where Search Console isn’t even something as simple as making sure there are no errors and making sure you have what your what’s known as your XML sitemap submitted really so basic stuff, which without you having that properly set up, yeah, could cause could cause you a real hindrance in ranking reasonably well for stuff. So in terms of just making sure those basics are done on search console is really important. So you can actually see what’s so at least that gives you some traffic then that you can actually review in analytics.

Alex:
I think we’ve even taken on clients who have used an SEO company that didn’t have Search Console set up or set up properly.

Tom:
There have been a few strange ones that haven’t really had the access to it and some of them haven’t had for example, like the XML sitemap, which is really basic nice. It’s Yeah, there’s an old gold with is always been around. But it’s just as important as always was.

Alex:
I think, just a pointer next setting these ones up. So with Google Analytics you get pretty much when you create your account. instructions to add a bit of code to every page of your website. Nowadays, pretty much every website has got like a header file that is used across every page. So you put it in there once or if you’ve got views WordPress that the WordPress plugins where you can add it and you just add your Google account number. And then you can also tie in and hooking together and integrate connects analytics and bringing in some of the Search Console data into Google Analytics as well currently, so you can once you’ve got Search Console, so if you do it in the order of set up analytics, you can use your analytics ownership once that’s installed and set up to add Search Console. And then you can link those together and preview some of that data in Google Analytics as well, can you?

Tom:
Yeah, really useful because it basically keeps everything in one place and into the search console is good. It’s not that user friendly. So it is actually easier to pull the data into Google Analytics and look at it in analytics. That’s what we tend to do. And it’s also worth mentioning the if you run Google ads, you can pull your Google Ads data in as well. So you’ve basically got everything all in one place. In your analytics and yeah it’s really really useful.

Alex:
Cool so now would be probably a good time just to chat about the sort of we sort of briefly mentioned Hot Jar the start because all that is kind of showing you like numbers stats and things like that but I think again I think people may not be so aware Hot Jar you can actually watch back as almost like a video how people have been sort of interacting with your website sort of which probably sounds a bit scary and a bit big brother to a few people.

Tom:
Yeah, so it’s where analytics can tell you the what’s in terms of people are sort of bouncing on this page or they when they land on the homepage, they don’t go through to the other night the wealth management or the remortgage page, so can tell you what people do and don’t do but it doesn’t really show you why then that’s what Hot Jar gives you and as you’ve said Hot Jar gives you back things like session recordings. So you can it’s all anonymous, and you might just need to check that it’s mental but your privacy policy, but you can’t see who they are. It’s essentially data-wise, it’s no different than analytics, which basically shows you which pages users use Hot Jar basically just shows you how to use it. So you can actually have session recordings so you quite literally see how people whether they’re on desktop you see how where they move the mouse, what they click on and what they actually do during that session. And so if you’ve got a page with a high bounce rate, it’s you can sort of like go look at that page, a target that page in Hot Jar and watch that what the sessions that people do on it, and then you may find that okay, people seem to get to a certain point halfway down the page and just sort of disappear or it could highlight an error on the page on certain devices. And yet, it’s really really useful what it also gives you is something called a heat map which basically shows you visually what people click on which links which buttons and whereabouts on the page. So analytics tends to show you in terms of the pages that people click on that doesn’t necessarily show you the right links. So for example, you may have you know, get a get an inquiry page that you can you know, that converts quite well but you may not know the actual link people click to get there. If you’ve got a few buttons on the page, maybe in your sidebar, maybe your website banner or header where it’s Hot Jar gives you that more qualitative information and it’s really, really useful.

Alex:
Yeah, I think it’s if you’ve got the I suppose a lot of people thinking it got time to watch it back. But it’s maybe just that, once you’ve, if you’re in a position where you aren’t getting you analytics is telling you you’re getting loads of website visitors but you’re not getting any leads through. And that maybe then a good time to just have a look and then get those setup and just watch them back. And you may just discover something that just because you know how to use your website and you know how to click do this out of that it may be that it’s just not that’s not very clear to other people come into view. And I think sometimes as well with websites, people will want to sort of reinvent the wheel and do something like different and jazzy and sometimes that’s not the best way to go. Like you don’t need to reinvent the wheel to do you need to, once you’ve got them to your website, and you’re sort of engaging with them. And you follow the principles that people if you follow the principles that people buy from people and love specialists, etc. You’re giving that information in then in terms of differentiating itself with jazzy design or, you know, complicated bits and pieces on your website. Is that actually helping you or hindering you? I think Hot Jar will clearly show you that.

Tom:
Yeah, absolutely. At the end of the day, more often than not, when people are doing web searches, they’re looking for information, whether they’re gonna watch it or read it. And it’s a case of just making it as easy as possible for people to do that, then if they want to get more information or get your advice, or turn into a lead, as we said before, with the web forms, just make it as easy as possible to do it in terms of yeah, make sure you have enough sort of call to action buttons, that does not just happen everywhere, have any form at the top and bottom of the page. So it’s easy to do, and just essentially make life as easy as possible that can be for people to get in touch with you.

Alex:
And I think they’re what we sort of discussed earlier, we’re not going to cover up every single tool that is available for your website. I think they’re the kind of three if you’re really kind of serious about wanting to generate more business wanting to sort of doing it yourself. I mean, there are other tools like you know, you’ve got mortgage brain 27 tech and a rate we’ve discussed at length and while we do not sort of massive fans of showing rates, you got chatbots, for real discuss that you know that the whole sort of form top right on the theory section works better. So there are all sorts of tools, other things for your website, I think like embed in your reviews we’re going to we are planning on to a whole episode I’ve said that I’ve teased this particular reviews that episode like for ages, we are going to talk about that as well. But in terms of kind of essential tools in terms of from a lead generation perspective, I wouldn’t sort of going too far outside these three for getting your bases covered, would you? Is there anything else you can think of in terms of

Tom:
No in terms of yeah or as far as we still say yeah, and analytics is the main one search console if they have it. But yeah, you’re right, in terms of getting analytics, if you don’t already have it on your website, as soon as possible, even if you don’t have time to look at it now is really, really useful. Because when you do have time to look at it, you’ve actually got something to look at. If you saw a thing, I’m not gonna look at it for a couple of months, then put it on, because you’ve got time to look at it will you have nothing to see. So it’s important to get on straight away. And then you can see what which parts of the website are performing well and which parts aren’t. But yeah, and it’s just great for showing where the impact and the effects that you’re sort of time and money has, whether it’s Facebook ads, organics, social stuff, SEO also thing called referral links, if you’re so you know, if you’re doing other kinds of advertising or having your self to appear in certain directories or whatever, you can see if you’re actually getting anything from it, it basically just stops you being blind, essentially, and just helps you make the decisions on your website based on data rather than just sort of assumptions which are, which is what we like we referrals, we like to do everything based on the information, everything based on the data, because then it takes people’s sort of assumptions out of it or, or, you know, the subjectiveness out of it. It’s almost like if I and you don’t agree on, you know, something, or how a website should be put together. The beauty of it is we can split that both and the numbers will tell us which ones right or which campaigns gonna work better or anything else like that. It’s but it just gives you that platform to be able to do it.

Alex:
And one thing I was gonna says I’m in we got asked by can’t say no, I’m spending this amount of money advertising on this website. I’ve got like a banner and a link back to ours. Is it worth spending that money? It was really quick for us to just check what they were actually getting out of it. It took a minute. Just to go back. Look, here’s this. This is the original website, how much traffic are we getting from that? How many leads we’re getting from that? How much is the cost of the traffic? How much is the cost per lead? And it was a really, really easy to give that information very quickly because analytics was set up. And then if they had not set up analytics, even though they weren’t using it, we would not have been able to give them that that answer really straight away. So one thing I would say as well is set up analytics yourself, create the account yourself, don’t get the web development company to do it. And if they do, make sure you are an admin of it, and you can, if you were to stop working with that web company, or that SEO company or the marketing, whoever you’re using, make sure you own it so that you can take them out and put your other person in. If you switch providers, it will be easy with your first website to get just say, Oh, can you do it for me, but I know there are a few people, I mean a few times where they’ve just not had the proper access or not been able to add someone new. And then we’ve had to set up a new Analytics account and we lost all that historic data, which can be frustrating for both sides. And I know we’re not talking about it. Now. Same with domain names as well don’t get the word company too because we but we’re having to do a transfer at the minute and it’s you get problems with like your email provider is kind of set up with your domain name if you have to transfer it you got to make sure they things come across sure when you’re doing websites like try to make sure you the domain and your tools and things like that that your you own it you set it up and then you provide access to the third party is one bit of advice I would definitely give.

Tom:
Yeah, definitely. Yeah, no you are I can be cancelled delay things or it can be so like a real headache making sure you have that kind of control and ownership. Even if somebody else does set it up just to make sure that you’re that you ask them to make you the admin which wish they could absolutely do that we will always do it for you know, analytics and everything else. We always give access like the admin so they can add users as they want to. Because the last thing it says is your website should be your data.

Alex:
One last thing to just cover off on these tools is the cost and Google Analytics and Google Search Console 100% free you never need to sort of pay anything for those Hot Jar is a product where there is a paid option but there is also a free option as well on the free you might find the free option will give you the info you need. Some of the paid stuff is where you want to sort of specifically find out detail, maybe you’ve got a big website and the specific stuff you want to test and things like that would probably be where you’d be more on the paid side, I can’t remember the cost of my head.

Tom:
I think it was like 25 quid a month. But more often than not, the free one will be fine. But it’s basically you can only sort of doing so many recordings at once you store so many recordings at once. You can only have things like heat maps on I think maybe three pages to start with. So you know, once you’ve got enough views on that you sort of got that then you can set up a new one, but you only have three running at the same time. I’m quite impressed with the free version of it. To be fair, I think it’s it’s more than fair what you get from it. But if you do need the paid one, it’s not exactly a bank breaker. It is good.

Alex:
Cool. Excellent. All right. Well, I think we’ve covered up nicely. So just to recap, Google Analytics that will tell you what is going on on your website, definitely get that installed straightaway. It should be fairly quick to do set up the account yourself and you can get your web developer to install it on your website. If you’re worried about getting involved in code Search Console, you can set up after you’ve set Google Analytics up and you can hook those up together. And then Hot Jar is like a separate sort of company on its own. And they’ll give you just a bit of code that you can put on your website. That’s really easy to do. If you give that to your developer as well just check your privacy policy, that you’re letting people know that you’re using that tool. And then yeah, that’s it. So thanks, Tom. I thought your speed of voice was was was on point today. We’ll have to ask Colin.

Tom:
That’s right. Yes. Colin. If you are listening, Colin, then I really do value the feedback. So I’m being genuine, genuinely.

Alex:
I think, to be honest, is one of the things like I always learned. That is the great thing about if anyone’s setting up their own podcast, definitely set up an accompanying group or community because you can just ask for feedback and it’s just a good reminder. Otherwise, you just go ahead and do what you normally do.

Tom:
And normally people are too nice as I’ll say anything.

Alex:
Yeah, exactly. And I expect God he’s actually genuinely nice Bloke as well as long as he does. mean it? in a nice way? Yeah. So feel free to leave your feedback in the group. I can actually delete it if I don’t like it. So don’t worry about it.

Tom:
The job of any admins. Yeah. So don’t worry. Don’t worry about it.

Alex:
Just even if you don’t think you’ll get approved, just let us know. And then we’ll all the good stuff all it will make visible to everyone. Yeah, no, it Yeah, to be fair, if people want us to talk about specific topics as well. Or if you have still got further questions about Google Analytics or search console or Hot Jar or any of the other episodes we’ve done before, that is what the Facebook group is for. So advisors assemble, or you may still find it under Lead Generation for Financial Services as well. Yeah. Any feedback on topics on the speed of the voice.

Tom:
Yeah

Alex:
Should I get on the microphone that I’ve got? Do I sound much better?

Tom:
Yeah. Well, yeah, you know, you’re much nicer voice than I did.

Alex:
It’s like Ron Burgundy

Tom:
From the south coast.

Alex:
I think a lot of it is the microphone, and I was debating the other day do I get one ship? shipped over to the sunny climates, Sleaford area.

Tom:
Okay. The heart of Lincoln chiming

Alex:
Yeah, absolutely.

Tom:
Yeah. Okay. Yeah, so we can see well because when I look at our solar software here then I can see I look quiet on this.

Alex:
Yeah, wavelength.

Tom:
Your wavelength is a lot thicker.

Alex:
Let’s stop there because that’s just gonna, That is not gonna be compliance or not gonna approve that. But we are not under the governing. We have no governing body so we can say like, excellent. Thanks very much. Leave your feedback. In summary, leave your feedback in the Facebook group.

Tom:
Yeah. See you soon.

Alex:
See you there.

Tom:
Bye

Alex:
Bye Bye

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