088 – Recruiting Advisers – Craig Skelton – CS Mortgage Solutions & CS Retirement Solutions

088 - Recruiting Advisers - Craig Skelton - CS Mortgage Solutions & CS Retirement Solutions
088 - Recruiting Advisers - Craig Skelton - CS Mortgage Solutions & CS Retirement Solutions

Alex:
Hello, and welcome back to the Advisor’s Assemble Podcast this week I’ve got Mr Craig Skelton from CS Mortgage Solutions and well newly sort of form CS Retirement Solutions as well. Craig, how’s it going?

Craig:
Yeah, thanks Ale, and you?

Alex:
Yeah, no, I’m really good. I’m really good to sort of have you on here because I was gonna say to you off air, but I bet there’s a few people who listen in that would love to be sort of in the position you’re in, where you were kind of saying like, your main sort of job now is you’re not advising anymore, or they used to be.

Craig:
Yeah, it used to be yes.

Alex:
Yeah. Well, we’ll talk through that. But you’re now it’s kind of like you’re recruiting more advisors. And you’re sort of your recovery response. That was like your main sort of job you were saying your main sort of concerns of kind of recruiting training, retaining advisors, but and then doing the marketing stuff as well. So you’ve kind of grown And got yourself into a position where you don’t have to advise anymore, which I bet there are quite a few people that would love to. So how long has it been now than that you’ve not sort of done any advice work.

Craig:
Probably about two years ago, probably about a year ago now since I’ve sort of done in proactive advising, I’ve done so advising up until probably the end of this year for existing clients and just reviews coming up and things like that, from a new client point of view. It’s been about 12 months ago, so also now.

Alex:
And was it always the plan when you set up the business to get away from and just grow it and grow advisors, or how did that sort of was it always your sort of dream to do that.

Craig:
It was ultimately that’s what I wanted to do in terms of timescales and business plans. And so that probably happened sooner than I thought in terms of the numbers and where we’re at. However, they say it’s always was my ultimate goal to have a team of advisers because that’s what I knew that was my background. That’s what I’ve always done is sort of managing a team of advisers always have been ultimately being employed and self-employed. But yeah, that was the ultimate goal.

Alex:
Nice. Yeah, I know. Well, I am because you introduce me to your BDM openwork. Julia and she was saying is rare for it’s normally she works with businesses that have been running for longer as key accounts, but you got there quite quickly. And she was kind of saying it was rare that that would happen so quickly. So she was kind of like saying you have grown pretty rapidly compared to a lot of other businesses.

Craig:
Something exciting, exciting times and still enjoy every minute, just a different concept to, to what I’ve known and but yeah, it’s, I’ve been very lucky to fail. So I have to say I’ve been very lucky in terms of the advisors that have joined the firm have not really gone out there and proactively sort of recruited, so I’ve never had an email, maybe they wanted to but never really productive recruitment campaign or anything like that. It’s just been more of it. organic growth and through word of mouth and people that I’ve known in the past that I’ve wanted to call self-employed and never thought of doing it before or people that I’ve known that have never solved the mortgage forward wanting to get into our, to the industry and so people that are that I knew when a new person from my past So yeah, I think I’ve just been lucky from that they shot a groaner that ***

Alex:
Well, let’s talk about how I sort of want it back then. And it looks on your snooping at your LinkedIn profile. And it was 2017 like 13 years ago, you’re working at William H. Brown. And that was a kind of you were looking after the team there is that right?

Craig:
Yeah. So 13 years ago, before I was always in I was in financial services, but banking world so High Street banks, in some ways, your roles and then decided to leave the banking world and get into the estate agency mortgage services. So yeah, that was then so I started out initially, myself and you then advisor, and then also as well managing a small team of advisors and self-writing business and then responsible for a few people just in that the height of the recession just as the bubble burst, really. And so that gave me a good ground, but that’s how it started. And then I think then six months, I was no longer doing the advice and then and managing the team, apparently, in various areas that I’ve worked in, in your domain. So where, where it wasn’t for the next rounds for a start out.

Alex:
And then nice little stint at countrywide as well. I think most people in front of services well, a lot of the mortgages have got countrywide on the CV as well.

Craig:
Yeah, I think it’s just either got the sequence call sequence or you’ve got control over locating a house and looking over our land looking at a to have both because that’s put me in touch with people that I work with today. So it should be I can never say it wasn’t time well spent, because it was in total and *** time, sort of sequence and country. Why? Because I learned a lot. I learned how to as a crew as an individual and how to lead teams really.

Alex:
Yeah. Because he was senior sales manager as well, country wise, and then went on to sort of managing a region for key retirement as well.

Craig:
Yeah. So that was the end of summit 2014. I left countrywide and went into equity release key, and it was a really, I’ve always had sort of quite a negative view about which innovation, which was very naive of me really, that at that time, I didn’t really know much about it. I just have seen the negative press and things like that. So as always, we’ll also I think *** got activity on the things I need to look into and find out more about it and was looking to manage the team of self-employed advisors in keen so they have a reason pointing in key or they’ll have a self-employed as well and I managed that team and I was also advising there as well so I did about advise in a key which only enjoy I also enjoy managing the team as well and it really opened my eyes to the equity release well at that time and where it was and where it was growing and how it was growing and how life-changing the world for individuals when they saw again that’s just a bit of a better mix into my past that’s helped me with my business today.

Alex:
Yeah, no, absolutely. I mean I similar similar sort of thing on the equity release for me just like the more I get to understand it, the more I really like it as a product. But yeah, it’s crazy, though, so that the general public Joe public’s view of it is pretty not great.

Craig:
And I think again, that’s, that’s just down an agonist on that because that’s I was using the word naive because that wasn’t a because I didn’t really look into that about it. But when you start to see people and so I experience what people are experiencing them from a personal point of view and by releasing equity in that home is life and it really is life-changing for these individuals, then you struggle not to buy integrated into so I say, don’t get me wrong I understand it’s not for everybody. It’s only about for the right people but for those people they are suitable for his testimony they will life-changing for those people without a shadow of a doubt.

Alex:
Yeah, no, definitely. What did you always want to set up your own thing that while you were working for like key and wouldn’t William H. Brown and countrywide, were you always in the back your head? We’re like, I’m definitely gonna create my own firm or how did it come about?

Craig:
He was always there in the back of my mind and quite a controlling person, or possibly I think that so I was always aware that I was not in control of my own destiny. I was always I was not 100% control of where I was going and what he’s doing and that could change at any moment in time. I’ve always been a quiet believer of whatever happens, happens and nobody will take my skills and my ability away from me. So whatever cards you get dealt, then you were in the employed well, then you just deal with that and then move on. Whereas obviously from a selfish point of view you, you are in charge of your own destiny, you are in charge of your own diary you in charge of your own world, whatever your commitment you put in, you do get a return it down to the hardware consistency, I knew that I knew that that was going to be something that I eventually wanted to get into. It was just, I think it’s just one of those things where there’s never a time is that there’s never a time within God that I’m going to do that in five years or three years or anything like that. I think. And that’s similar to the conversations I have with people that are looking to join the firm right now or looking to join in the future or who have joined their families. It’s a very sad opinion that there is never a right time to do it. You’ve just got to pay yourself the best you can and get things in order. And then just get on and do it. And if you’ve got the right mindset in attitude behaviour, then you will make it work, you will make it work. And that’s the thing is the opportunities are out there. It’s just actually about being brave and sort of making it work.

Alex:
Yeah, no, absolutely. I think well, there’s a lot of people setting up. I’ve seen lots of kind of mortgage businesses setting up a sort of during lockdown or just before spoke to quite a few people that started in January or literally, like now, there was never, you know, you can’t predict what’s going to happen. And you know, baptism of fire definitely, I think, people starting out and then I saw someone on LinkedIn, never say no, we’ll just have my one year anniversary my business I thought, wow. So Brexit and the global pandemic in your first year, like hats off, and you’re doing really well. That’s like, I’m pretty sure it’s not gonna get much worse than that. You’re riding through, you’re doing all right.

Craig:
Yeah, you would hope not. I think that is quite funny the world that we’re in today. Get some new to set up a year ago and gone through what the experiences they’ve gone through I think will appreciate things a lot more, I think is because they have been down with the sort of city in tech and real doubt in their business and setting up a year ago. What time is that? I’ve got people in the firm that have set up to go within the firm and got into some new thinking, wow, I think to talk to the advisory firm this week, we do have quite a bit of a laugh and joke about it. I think, well, like we won’t complain anymore about the little things I used to complain about. Because we cut here we have we’re all crying out to get back to how it was and what that looks like. But then yes, I think the I think hats off to anybody that’s making it stick and make it continue to have these tough times will certainly come out the other side and certainly benefit from that hard work and the drive they’ve put in and the systems during the rails are tough times.

Alex:
How quickly did you start recruiting when you set up it was like, what was it July 2017? Did you bring people in straight away? Or was it just you at the beginning?

Craig:
Yeah, the beginning there was myself and two other advisors, so two advisors that I knew, and that we’re working for employers, mortgage advisors and came along for the ride really, at that time, that was after we set up a new business, there were no promises, there was no sort of things that we had set up an agreed and going, concrete sort of things and what we were going to do from the start, we knew what the plan was and how that looked. But we knew we had to be very adaptable on how things would change day in, day out week in week out. So yes, we started me and two advisors to experienced advisors. So we sat between three of us. It’s who then became four within the exit experience advisor. And that was sort of I think we ended 2017 with I think there were about five years in the end, so another advisor into it never been in an object before newest age and so ever sold the mortgage in his life before him. And that’s how we ended in 2017. So yeah, we so quickly got from three to four to five in the first six months.

Alex:
Thanks for that, it’s super quick, tell me through then it saved someone like me. I’ve never given mortgage advice to anyone. And if I know enough to be dangerous, if they say I was in a, I was a state agent, or I was always a salesman, I suppose whining about what do you look for in terms of so that person or anyone else that’s kind of can you get a few people listening really early on in that they’re thinking about getting into it, and maybe they were an estate agent? What do you particularly look for? What sort of qualities do you think makes a good advisor?

Craig:
It’s about having the talent and what that talent looks like, for me is really, somebody. We’ve got quite a core values of a business and somebody joining the firm has to have that sort of have those two core values really so and these are things that I’ve picked up over the years and learn from mistakes as well, I think that’s the thing is they learn from the mistakes of recruitment advisors and try to think from having a great will, they’re going to make a great advisor, but what’s nice about their advisors’ core values, so for me, it’s having that sort of drive and persistence motivation, the right mindset is not about experience. I think that’s the big thing for me is I’ve done a very rarely look, tactical recruit for the experience. So we have to be in something the other day was just from an overall financial advisor, you know, just mortgage advisor, the foreign financial advisor point of view in the contract. Now there’s a population of 27,000 financial advisors, like include including launch advisors, it’s shocking. Suppose it looks like that they took averages and they expect 15,000 of those 27,000 advisors to retire within the next 10 years. So there’s gonna be a massive, massive gap. In the market, and then what I also looked at was that when you look at any recruitment, financial advice, mortgage advice, point of view, generally speaking, is that experience required this experience that people look for experience. So it doesn’t make sense in a world where we’ve got fewer advisors coming through, we’ve got advisors that are going to retire. And companies looking for experience. Well, that naturally to me shows there’s a bit of an issue there that have fewer advisors in a world that does need financial advice and ****. It’s a just a natural, there’s a gap there that I can sort of think and see that this is going to be causing an issue in the continuing now from for years to come. So that was my starting point with the recruitment and then looking at the way that our start is just looked at from a talent point of view. So the thing I do, first of all, is just have a chat with them over the phone. Have a very informal, no structure, no agenda, let’s just have a chat about them, what we are how we work, and what they’re about. It’s just a conversation because the thing for me is how they can build rapport with me, initially, in that first 510 minutes on the telephone, on a call them to prove to me that with the right training, they can build rapport because building rapport and having a conversation is not something you can really teach and train and you just been born with that ability. And obviously, that sort of gross, he was very much about that. That’s how just having a conversation, we’re sort of seeing what their values are and it starts from there. And if that’s an agreement from both myself and the advisor, that we’ve had a good conversation, then I’m sad about the firm and how I work because I think that’s important as well, it’s very much when you sort of go to any recruitment event or when you have to look to the past, it’s always sort of been very much about sort of selling the role to a candidate whereas I’ve just never done that. I never do that. It’s just really just a conversation about how that’s about them and as much as I possibly can about the role of mortgage adviser if they’ve never done that before. And I think that’s the just start from there they have they got that sort of raw talent to have a whole conversation with me and just really build that rapport for them, for them, and then are they interested at the end of it for them follow that up with a pitch was a meeting face to face? Are they interested in that? And is that am I interested enough to then sort of mingling with those people as well, but it’s not this is not the actual experience of I’ve done launch advising for this long or this is, for me, it’s about that ability to build rapport, deliver the service that we’re expecting, and the costs our customers expect. And that’s, that’s the key thing to me.

Alex:
So if someone was looking and not even done, start doing qualifications or anything like that, how early on are you looking for sort of someone that’s good, like, especially if it’s not about experience what stage if I’m just thinking about it should I get in touch with someone like you or someone local?

Craig:
If he’s within an organization the fact that we’ve had to provide a network. The good thing, the one thing about overwork is that they’re very much about the academy. So whether you’ve got no experience whatsoever in the mortgage world, no qualifications or anything, you can come become part of the firm and work through open works Academy so you’re part of the third working with on isn’t the interaction with myself and the rest of the advisors in the business. But then the same Tasha you understand in the mortgage world, but then at the same time, open work for you through your mortgage qualification, so and do more than the academy stuff to get you through the qualification. So it doesn’t really matter it from that point of view, where you don’t have to have any qualification whatsoever if you thought you wanted to get into mortgage services or finance advising in and you can do it with no qualifications whatsoever. We just take you through that process and put you in that position where you will become a qualified advisor within the firm within the network, point of view or a financial advise point of view.

Alex:
When you’re recruiting before on sort of you made good decisions, you make bad decisions, what advice would you give to anyone else that he’s kind of recruiting at the moment in terms of is it literally like, just think about the person and like, get you, make sure you know what your values are, and look for someone that matches that and then work on the skills later or any other advice or anyone else recruiting?

Craig:
I will say, absolutely. In terms of your core values. I think if you tend to recruit that person and work well with a person that has similar values to yourself, that’s a natural thing that will happen. So the more that you do, the more do that you tend to be more successful. The one thing that I’ve always said, I rely on now more than anything I’ve ever done before. It’s just my gut instinct. It might sound very corny, it might sound very stupid actually. But go ahead Instant has always been buying this proved to me in this world that just when you’re thinking, if you’re an advisor that’s running a firm with yourself and possibly another one, we’re looking to prove that advisor for the first time, you will have a gut instinct about that person. And why to be true to that gut instinct because that gut instinct will be right. Whether you find out day one or one six or 12, you’ve gut instinct will be right, and you will look yourself in the mirror in whenever that happens and say, Craig, you’ve arrived in the first place, he should have just trusted your gut instinct. And I think that the more you do that episode, the more you do recruit them, they tend to get things right. And I think you always have to look at the size of the candidate and think actually, they’ve got to have it installed in them from the start in terms of the right ethics, you try and if you’re looking for to recruit and you’re struggling to recruit, you’re sorted, then be you will act on certain things. So you’ll cut corners and things that well. This is what you start with your staff. So they must have this must-have that must have that. And then when you say we want to start very eager with that, that’s what they must have. And then by week three, and if you’ve not found somebody or the people that you seem to know doesn’t quite fit what you’re looking for a stick to your guns. That’s what I’d say because it will come back to home to upset and I’ve learned that from experience and where I’ve thought to myself are just like that once at that big slide or let that be. I’m not too worried about that. But we’re actually I was bothered about it because it did bother me in the first place. You just have to be true to yourself. And I think that’s the same from a candidates point of view, I think as well. Like I say to all the candidates is the biggest issue decision for them as it is for me, so they’ve got to be true to themselves as well. And that’s why I’m quite truthful in when I meet people face to face. I will tell them all about all seven Look, I will try and put you off from doing this role because it’s a tough role. You will get days of real high you’ll have days of *** don’t pay for that nobody can actually from mortifies point of view we have we talked about that, but nobody can actually prepare you for those days, it’s just gone. So I think I’m always honest with the template from the start. And given as much information on how we work as a firm. And as and how they fit that and their role within that firm, then it’s going to be fit right for them. And I say, as a candidate, I would say stick to what you’re looking for in that next role. And if it doesn’t fit, don’t cut corners, don’t make it fair. Just actually stick to what you’re looking for. Because guarantee in three months, six months, 12 months time, two years time when things start to get a bit tougher, then all of a sudden you think actually, I didn’t want to do this anyway, because, for this reason, I didn’t like this because this anyway, and those will eat away. So I think it’s just about people being true to themselves.

Alex:
How many is too many to recruit? Or is that is that not an issue? Do you would you become overwhelmed if you had if you brought on 10 people in one week or something?

Craig:
Yeah, I think 10 people more would be maybe ***, Alex ***

Alex:
The challenging session

Craig:
Yeah, I don’t think that is, it’s never going to be clear to too many that there is a sort of too many sorts of a pivot within this, you know, from a business point of view, I would then look at recruiting somebody or to fulfil certain aspects of the role to then continue the growth of the firm. So, bringing somebody on board to develop the relationships or advisor development, all of those things are doing so they say they recruited the trade and in between and then one of those codes like bit delegates something else or keep jumping, something that you trusted to run that party. So I would sort of say, there’s no such a limit on the path, I think because you’ve just got to be so the thing for me within this firm is that we’re all very, very lucky because we’re all good friends within the firm. So I think that really helps. as well. And if you get too many then obviously that can so I think then if you stick to the core values you’ve been through in the first place, I think you’ll just recruit more quality people within the ad into the quality team that you have already and answer your question. No, there is never too many all at once. Yes, definitely. But I think that’s it’s just getting the *** is that and getting those skills that need to get out there and flourishing and that’s what we do.

Alex:
How do you guys like manage your admin? Do you have to your advisors do that on themselves? If you got like an admin team? How does that work for you guys?

Craig:
All the advisors do their own admin to the fair we do have an administrator that just runs everything from a central point of view, but actual day to day if I saw administration, from an advisors point of view, advisors do the wrong because I think dislike me is that the control and can aspect we did things on the administrator intertext with the administration from the advisors, and they never used it because they will not use to have it as administrators, so what they intended to do with no doubt to use their facility, I just thought at that point, there’s no point in us having that facility, their advisors aren’t with us. Because again, I think it just comes down to the controller, if they are all responsible for their advice, their customer, they enjoy taking the customer through the journey through the ups and downs, really. And I think that’s the thing, of course, was part of the data experience. Some of the feedback I received when I was looking at this is that the customers wanted to speak to their buyers and have a sort of contact with the advisor on a regular basis, and vice versa. The consultant wanted to know where the customer was from their point of view as well. So all our advisors do their own administration to a certain extent because they just don’t feel in control. And so it’s positive from their point of view. And it’s also positive as well from the customer’s point of view because that’s the feedback they gave me as well.

Alex:
Nice. Yeah, it makes sense. Makes sense with your you did, obviously Some equity release stuff with a key but you’re sort of doing a bit more sort of wealth, pensions and things like that. And remember, we spoke before and you said personally, you don’t want to know the ins and outs of it, you’ve got the advisors. But in terms of business perspective, what was the what When did you kind of decide I want to do mortgages and the wealth side.

Craig:
Web server, something that I always wanted to get into even when we started out on this journey three years ago, I think the thing for me is that customers buy from a brand so once you’ve got a brand they trust to know, the more they tend to buy more from that brand. So what was frustrating for me as it has a customer there was CS Mortgage Solutions clients testimony solutions customer who needed pension advice, we would then refer on to another business or they wanted equity release advice. We will refer to another business. There is nothing wrong with the businesses we’re referring to because they gave good service. However, what I found was the customers are more likely to buy into you and take on that service. If they’d already bought into the branch or was referring to a third party, they already see that as a third party don’t they didn’t see that as CS Mortgage Solution. So say somebody we just referred onto, whereas now they sort of see actually as part of a brand new this one brand. So, for me, that was the thing, the long term goal of the business was within anybody’s financial need, we would be able to facilitate it and services within the business. So they said pensions, investments, equity release, and we’re looking at sort of commercial mortgages and things like that at the moment as well. So that’s something else we’re looking to do. So if that’s the thing is then because I see I think the firm belief for me is that the customers buy into that brand and more likely to users from a pension point of view, investment point of view or will or whatever the case will be from a financial need the boys’ band already we’ve not got win them over to buy into the brand we’ve already done that it’s them it’s just an easy win to then sort of getting into that thing is that the clients like it as well that they have the deal because some advisors do the mortgage on the pension as well so the advisors the clients like it that they’ve just been with one person from all the financial needs, they get great service that’s the tick box from that point of view that all their financial services are looked after by this one person.

Alex:
What’s the best way to build that brand and make sure that is that all down again, probably comes back to your advisors I’m guessing in terms of that brand like because it’s a lot of it’s all kind of it used to be more sort of face to face is your people are kind of representing your brand and that’s got to be a really good experience for them than to want to use you guys again, on the wealth side.

Craig:
Yeah, definitely it goes back to service so they understand that they are representing the brand and the advisers represent the brand and they don’t want to let the top of the brand nicely. They don’t want to let the team down. Sorry. they pride themselves on the five-star reviews if they don’t, they don’t want to get four-star reviews and if they did get anything less than five stars they would feel as though they’re letting the brand down but also as well letting the team down within the brand which is nice if those were looking for me because I have got that sort of team ethic that they want to deliver that great service because it just doesn’t wanna let the brand down because we just don’t want any sort of negative feedback or negative incidents against the firm and those as an as individuals.

Alex:
What can you do that to make sure your team are always so you’ve got that obviously getting the right people? Is it culture then do you think to make sure your team are all pulling together and you do not sort of doing your own thing? What’s the key? Do you think..

Craig:
Cultures the right I think you’re absolutely right with culture then that is the culture is a big thing within a business. I think that the thing that I struggle with the beginning was that the advisor works remotely in terms of advising the North East in Lancashire now and in *** place in Yorkshire, so they’re all very well, they are all very well. And I think it is about that culture of helping each other and very much. So that’s what I was always keen to do was on like in the past where we’d have monthly meetings because we’re all employed and in that environment, we’d have an office to go to and think that I was very much a different way of working whereas now we have monthly catch up calls for whatever medium we want to do. We normally have an on the CFP advisor, at least face to face once a month, just sit down in some coffee establishment or something some way and just have a chat about their world in the business and what they’re doing. And then we get together once a quarter as well and just go out and have a good time as a team and as a business. So whether that’s going through races or an hour in the town or the city or anything like that. That’s interesting to build out a relationship between the advisors. I mean, the thing is, they know they’ve got each other’s backs. I know that I know. Some of you have got an issue in a complicated case, we’ve got a Whatsapp group set up where somebody will put on there a little bit about their supply circumstances, obviously keep in GDPR, and not their names. But just give the class scenario on there. And I think you get people to get a response. So the more people if you post something on there, and you get a response, you they’re more likely to respond next time. If somebody put something out there, you know the answer to the question. So it’s very much a team, so a culture going on that. They know that even though they’re all remotely, I know, some advisors still have unhappy like still afternoon sessions now where they might have met all the ones that live close to each other. They might have met up once a month and just have a chat about the world and somewhere to vent and somewhere to take out the frustrations have been a motivator, but then it’s doing that, too, but I think it does create that culture of so everybody’s in this together and we really so they want into the business to grow it. It’s it goes back to the To me in my beliefs, I’ve always trapped people as I want to be trapped myself. And I think that’s the core thing is that particularly now the people, everybody in the firm of self-employed as mortgage advice, or financial advisors is about dealing with treating people as people. That’s how I know how I want to be treated as an individual. And that’s how I ensure that I treat the individuals in the business and vice versa. So we just do get on well, from that point of view, because we do treat each other like adults, we do understand each other’s frustrations and what makes them explode, makes them sort of motivated wherever they can to be. So yeah, is creating that sort of culture. I think it goes back to the recruitment in the first place. So you’ve got a recruitment person that shares your same values and ethics and then that they will just naturally fit into your culture because you created that culture in the first place. So the culture that so myself and totally advisors created from the start. just added to that and added to that, and other than that, allowing that and then learning that. So it’s just fun for us to do that. Once you have got that culture, as long as you’ve got the vibe included in the first place.

Alex:
Excellent. Well, I think we’ve covered like, if anyone is recruiting or thinking of getting a job in the industry, I think we got it. Is there anything else that you would that we’ve not discussed that you would either someone looking or someone looking to recruit, you’d want to share? Or I think we’ve covered it off? We have literally, almost given the manual. Is there any last bit of advice that you would give to anyone that is recruiting or looking to recruit? Is there anything that we haven’t covered off today do you think?

Craig:
Nothing to summarize is just made sure you don’t cut corners in terms of recruitment have a strict recruitment policy, stick by that and making sure that the candidate fits right with you and what the profile you want within your business and shares your core values.

Alex:
Love it. Brilliant Craig, I’m looking for work or I just want to get if there’s something that I’ve not asked you and there’s someone that wanted to ask you anything when’s the best place to sort of getting in touch with us at LinkedIn or drop you an email or…

Craig:
However, they want to is absolutely fine. So LinkedIn on there so Craig Skelton is fine on LinkedIn or my email address is craig@CSFG.co.uk, so and you can give me a calling mobile as well.

Alex:
Thank you so much. Great. Thanks for spending your time with us. And yeah, really appreciate all that as there are loads there for anyone I know specifically, a couple of people that are recruiting as well as I’m sure they’re going to be listening in. So yeah, appreciate it. Mate. I will speak to you soon.

Craig:
Thank you.

Alex:
No worries. Bye.

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